Week after week, you come in on Monday morning and take a look at last week’s numbers in detail. You see the same stagnant production every time you look at that report. You just can’t seem to get over that plateau that’s keeping you from taking the next step as an alarm dealer. Sound familiar? So, why is it that some alarm dealers seem to be taking the industry by storm, while others are stuck in that five to ten a week phase? Having support from a strong alarm dealer program is important, but taking the next step forward really comes down to knowing how to properly set business goals, the way top alarm dealers do.

The smart home security industry can be complex. Things like truck rolls, approval percentages, time to install, and more all influence your numbers, and can sometimes seem out of your control. At the same time, these variables are part of what makes this industry so lucrative for salespeople. If it was easy, everyone would do it. There are a ton of resources out there that talk about setting goals, but they’re all so vague, and don’t leave you with anything actionable. Top rated alarm dealers have goal setting down to a science, and you should too.

You might already be setting goals. You may even be hitting them a decent amount of the time. However, simply building a strong, goal setting foundation, where you can hold yourself accountable, can help you take that next step. Are all of your goals specific to the point where you and your team know exactly what you’re going after? How will you know when you’ve achieved your goals? Below, we outline a structure that’s used by many other alarm dealers. This method helps them overcome plateaus, and keep growing.

Top Alarm Dealers Set S.M.A.R.T. Goals

Regardless if you’re solo selling door to door or have a ten person call center, planning for the future can be difficult as an alarm dealer. Most dealers tend to run their businesses on a week-by-week basis, meaning that they’re making decisions based on where their production is for their current week. While production is crucial, this mentality puts you behind the eight-ball. You need to be setting the right kind of goals so that your team has the direction they need to succeed, and you’re able to focus on growth rather than just this week’s production.

The big alarm dealers in the industry use the S.M.A.R.T. model when setting goals. This approach ensures all of your goals are clearly defined, have a definitive end, and can realistically be accomplished within a given timeframe. S.M.A.R.T stands for specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely. A goal properly set will fulfill the needs of each part of the acronym, and set the foundation for you to succeed and grow as an alarm dealer.

Specific

The first piece of the S.M.A.R.T. model—specific—means that all goals should be clearly written, and define what exactly you want to do. What are you trying to achieve? Specific goals answer the What, Why, and How of the S.M.A.R.T. model. The difference between setting a goal, and setting a specific goal is the difference between saying, “I want to be rich”, and “I want to increase my annual income by 10%”. Your goals should be exact! One of the biggest challenges alarm dealers have is that they set goals that are too broad or too vague. Laser-target your goals, and get them done!

Example:
Within the next 60 days, increase average time on call by two minutes by hosting a handling objections training and holding all team members accountable for the material learned, so that we can have more opportunities for conversion.
Explanation of Example:
What? = “Increase average time on call by two minutes”
How? = “hosting a handling objections training and holding all team members accountable for the material learned in the training session.”
Why? = “so that we can have more opportunities for conversion”

Measurable

How will you know when you’ve accomplished your goal? A measurable goal allows you to identify what you will see, hear, and feel once you’ve made it. To successfully set measurable goals, you need to break them down into measurable elements with clear milestones that keep you aware of the progress you’re making. A strong, measurable goal will provide you with concrete evidence that you’ve either achieved it, or came up short. Being “successful” is not a measurable goal. At what point are alarm dealers considered “successful”? We always want more, so if the goal isn’t measurable, it wasn’t set properly.

Example:
Within the next 60 days, increase average time on call by two minutes by hosting a handling objections training and holding all team members accountable for the material learned, so that we can have more opportunities for conversion.
Explanation of Example:
Important metric for this goal: Average Time on Call

Home Security Dealer E-Book, Crushing the Security Game SMART Goals

Attainable

The third piece of a S.M.A.R.T. goal—attainable—reminds us how important it is that goals be realistic and reachable. When you consider the time and effort that it will take you to reach the finish line, is your goal within reach? At the same time, is it still difficult? The power is in finding the happy medium between possible and impossible.

Many alarm dealers run into issues setting goals that are either too low or too high. If you really want to push your team to grow, your goals should be difficult enough that they motivate you, but be within reach so that you are hitting them at least 50% of the time. If you are hitting your goals 100% of the time, they aren’t goals, they’re tasks—and they’re too easy.

On the contrary, if you’re goals are too difficult, it will have an adverse effect. Constantly coming up short of your production goals can destroy your motivation. Understand your team members, and set goals that are within reach, but challenging so that you hit them about 50% of the time.

Example:
Within the next 60 days, increase average time on call by two minutes by hosting a handling objections training and holding all team members accountable for the material learned, so that we can have more opportunities for conversion.
Explanation of Example:
Is it realistic for you to have the material to host a handling objections training within the next 60 days? If not, reach out to your dealer program to see what type of materials they can provide to help train your team members.

Relevant

Sometimes, the “why” is just as important as the how. Think to yourself, is this goal relevant to you and your business? How is this goal aligned with your team goals? Your goal may be to protect twice as many homes as the previous year by increasing the size of your sales team. However, increasing the size of your sales team may not be the best move when you consider the cost that comes with hiring and training. Therefore, it would conflict with some of your financial goals.

Think like the best alarm dealers. Understand your company, and your team. A more relevant goal might be protecting twice as many homes this year by changing the way you are training your team, or by dedicating a specific amount of time weekly to listening to phone calls.

Example:
Within the next 60 days, increase average time on call by two minutes by hosting a handling objections training and holding all team members accountable for the material learned, so that we can have more opportunities for conversion.
Explanation of Example:
You know how important time on call is with a sales pitch. While you don’t want your sales team wasting time, you don’t want them to give up after the first “no” either. This goal is relevant because it matches the needs of your company. If one of your goals is to increase production, time on call is an important variable that will keep you on track for that goal as well.

Timely

The last, and most important piece of the S.M.A.R.T. model is to make sure all of your goals are time-bound. A goal without a plan is just a wish. Deadlines force you to take action. It’s okay for your timeline to be relatively flexible, but if it doesn’t exist, you won’t have the urgency to attack it. For top alarm dealers, urgency is everything. A timely goal completes the S.M.A.R.T. model because every other piece of the puzzle is reliant on the timeline. You need a timeline for it to really be specific, and there’s no point in measuring something that has no end date. Complete your goal with a time deadline, keep your team accountable to hitting it, and see an immediate increase in production and motivation.

Example:
Within the next 60 days, increase average time on call by two minutes by hosting a handling objections training and holding all team members accountable for the material learned, so that we can have more opportunities for conversion.
Explanation of Example:
“Within the next 60 days” is a time-bound and realistic deadline. You’ll either host the training within that timeline, or you’ll miss your goal.

Conclusion

Now that you have a solid foundation and know how to set goals like top alarm dealers, you can begin formatting and aligning your own goals to meet the same structure. Start with the ones that are the most important, and work your way down from there. This will ensure that all of your goals are relevant to your business’ wildly important goal.

One of the most powerful things you can do is hold your team members, and yourself, accountable to both the structure and the goals you set. You need to have your entire team speaking the same language.

Smash through your production plateau. S.M.A.R.T. goals are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely, and are crucial to your future growth. The way you set and take action towards your goals today affects your success tomorrow.

Home security sales has evolved. You’re no longer just closing deals, you’re running a business. We’ve transformed our dealer program to drive your success as an entrepreneur. See how the strength of the Alliance Security Dealer Program can help you reach your goals. 

LEARN MORE

Share this article with someone who needs help pushing through a production plateau or is ready to start growing as an alarm dealer.